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Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)
would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground, crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions, but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832, the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of the greek
is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are an easing institutions for -- are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a surplus between deficit -- at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduct of that -- conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is the same thing as -- is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must have been. -- happen. 1 -- society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down in 2008. -- like in 2008. it is of
of the u.s. government it would make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. but some things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market
of the u.s. government it uld make us look like greece tomorrow. instead, they are in like netherland so stuff like this happens. >> we're beginning to look like greece right now. butome things have improved. prices have gone up but that is supply and demand issue. supply is way down so delinquency rights are still very high. >> this is biggest government stimulus program of all. people forget, this stimulus, five trillion bucks. the president is rallying about fat cat bay but they were exempt from dodd-frank. they basically dominate the mark 90% of the mortgage market. they've got government backing. they don't have to compete. they don't have to out perform. they make more money than the government overseer, that is doing their job. you have directors there making millions of dollars. we should have reined them in long time ago. >> there was a ignite named franklin rains, he made $90 million back during his reign and they gave out $45 million in bonuses. these organizations have a bad history. >> they got a bad history. we have always known that. they were never real based on market fo
story. that i would love to, thank you. >>> greece has become the gateway to hundreds of thousands of migrants to enter the country, many of them muslims. athens remains the only eu capital without unofficial moscow. now there are plans to build one next year. will the bankrupt companies -- will the bankrupt country have trouble delivering? >> underground crowded, a legal, the place of worship for muslims and athens. dozens of these poor rooms serve be a huge community. -- dozens of these prior rooms serve out a huge community. >> we respect all religions but they did not have the respect of our muslims to provide as a regular, legal mosque for our workshop. >> the shadow of a now distant past. no mosques have been built in athens since christian greece gained independence in 1832 the omi e.u. capital without. but could that change? this was the site chosen for the first mosque. but previous promises have come to nothing in there is a financial crisis. >> there was a fear in the greek society about the construction of a mosque. we must overcome these fears. it is the commitment of
this administration. we have to reduce spending. we are heading down the same path that greece did. right now the democrats are talking about raising taxes on the top 2%. if we do not stop the spending, we will be back here again maybe one year from now saying, maybe we need to raise taxes on the top 25% or 50%. then everybody will be taxed and we will run out of money. what is going to happen is the federal government is not going to be able to take care of its obligations. you are not going to be able to have safety nets. social security and medicare are going broke. we have to fix those of those who are dependent on those systems can get them. continuing to spend money like both parties have been doing the, wild spending is going to lead us to be just like greece. we are not going to be able to take care of the poor or the needy or take care of senior citizens. we have to stop spending. host: this is fiscal year 2010, but it has not changed significantly in terms of percentage. 41% of the federal budget. not defense appropriations 19%. defense spending 20%. the national debt 6%. we're in t
, washington state in surplus. illinois, the dakotas in debt. missouri is your equivalent of in greece, a permanent bailout. the thing is, whereas markets are amazing institutions for allocating existing goods and services among consumers, they are chronically bad at creating a balance between deficit and surplus regions. a geographic problem, and intertemporal. remember -- if that comes first, suddenly the money lender who later becomes a banker who later becomes wall street plays a hugely significant role in this process. the banker is the conduit of that recycling mechanism. when they get an increase in proportion as the result of their mediation of that process. given that, a failure of the banker is not the same thing as the failure of a clothes maker. suddenly, there are two things that must happen. one, society will demand that banks are not allowed to go to the wall. then bankers are affectively given carte blanche, free money for themselves. and the whole mechanism breaks down like in 2008. it is often said in the eurozone, we made a huge error in europe of binding disparate
greece and half of europe. neil: some say we'll be like greece if in is no deal by the end of the year? >> i do not agree. we have to negotiate, the presiden needs to get involved. neil: the language changed little bit today, i notice when they are not attacking each other out in open, then progress must be being made. that is what led to rumors of a potential imminent deal yesterday. now they are back to sniping, speaker boehner and nancy pelosi and others going back and forth, that leads me to believe that things are falling apart, do you get that sense? >> we see here -- hear they are negotiating, we'll get a deal, then we hear the fighting going on, if the fighting continues, we're not getting a deal. i don't want a deal if it is just the same old deal that is not good for america. neil: do you worry, as i guy has been around the neck of the woods for a few years, that republicans are losing their verve. some more conservative members ve said we lost an election but we did not los everything that we stand for, yet, everything i hear talked about, are concessions on part of the repu
austerity measures have prolonged. not taken that area out of recession. in greece, you often hear members of this house who say the united states economy is going to be like greece. oh, really? greece is not growing. greece has lost 25% in its economy in the past five years. greece's economy shrunk by 7% this year alone. there's a 20% unemployment rate in greece and even higher for younger people. greece doesn't make anything that the rest of the world wants. the american economy is dynamic. the american economy always needs to be improving with education, scientific research and infrastructure investment. so, a rational system, a rational political system would respond much differently than what is going on here in this congress. we're talking about spending cuts and allowing tax cuts that haven't produced economic growth to be extended. all of the people that are talking about spending did all the spending. they are the debt and deficit creators. if we want to experience economic growth we have to invest in this economy. and it's critically important to the future of this nation. medica
's reacting, at some point we will become greece, there aren't any more hypothesis. >> charles, why are they still relatively calm? i think they're relatively calm because of what charlie said. the markets believe we will get a deal. the leadership is trying to get a deal, but it's not easy and by the way by the way-- >> adam, adam. >> charlie, not the end of the world. >> markets like short-term fixes, too. and just because-- >> markets like money printing and. >> neil: by the way, i know i might offend some of you market enthusiasts here, but markets can be wrong and markets might be satisfied. >> they're always wrong. >> neil: a short-term gift and remember the first tarp vote rejected and the market fell about 800 points and run back together and get a deal going and the market ends up being 4,000 points lower a few months later. so, ben, my worry is basing everything you do on a market selloff. >> well, the markets are always wrong, neil because they change the next day or the next hour. and for long periods of time, they have a modest degree of predicted value. >> neil: would
, portugal, certainly greece. so you have those economic woes. the euro is not going to thrive and it may survive thanks to the ecb, but you're not going to get that economy to thrive, and the fiscal union ask those are very slow going and though they may be moving quickly by european standards and i've been given the magnitude of the problem going very slowly. >> how should people be thinking about this? the average american, and they've been hearing about it for so long and they're not sure it will affect their pocketbook. do you think they will? >> and there's this incredible chance that greece will leave and the dominos will begin to fall. i think that's unluikely to happen as long as the ecb is willing to support that currency, but will it thrive? will those economies boom? i don't think so, i think it will be another year of recession and you will find individual opportunities and the stock picker's market and far as it's a strong growth, they're not there yet. >> thanks so much for joining us. good to see you tonight. >> you heard piers morgan talk about it with larry last week. af
much time talking about europe and greece. the rest of the world is absolutely on fire, where people obviously focus on is china. in september, they approved infrastructure projects. love the way the stocking is acting the last couple of days. dagen: you are bullish on the global economy. charles: for a while now. connell: you are not worried about china athol? charles: i think china is going to continue to be on a roll. i am also impressed with brazil, indonesia and turkey. the rest of the world really doing extraordinarily well. connell: we like when you go global on us, charles. what do you use, google maps or apple? charles: stuart varney is probably better than me when it comes to these smart phones. connell: i do remember when you got away from the flip phone. charles: that is only because i left it in the green room. i heard someone from the smithsonian came up. dagen: charles, thank you so much. connell: let's go to this google graphic story. it is a very popular app. let's put it that way. we will talk about that coming up. more from washington, the house speaker ready to pu
'll lose everything we know as america if we don't fix entitlements. we're becoming the greece of out-of-control spending. [ ♪ dramatic ♪ ] >> it in no way does that. >> stephanie: shut down that argument. the spending graphs of who -- >> nonsense. >> also, greece is falling apart because of the austerity programs implemented by the inf and the world bank. >> stephanie: we have references on that. they're wrong wrong wrong on everything. [ wah wah ] >> stephanie: i'm flabbergasted how wrong they are. 17 minutes arrive the hour. you know what else flabbergasts me? being able to carbonate soda in 90 seconds. >> my friend had a soda stream. i got to do it. it is amazing. >> did you karate chop? >> no but it is amazing seriously. >> stephanie: you're such a sad little man. >> i don't get out much! >> stephanie: new way to enjoy great-tasting soda made fresh at home. >> i'm flabbergasted. >> stephanie: flabbergasting how good it is with bourbon. you can make it fresh at home. everybody loves a soda s
the brink. greece got upgraded today. who would have thought it. that is what the market is looking at. saying okay. it is not going to be the worst kcase sharcenario, but you coul extend the middle class tax cuts and be done with it. it is in a recession. >> and i think the market would not like that very much. everybody is expecting that you get the middle class tax cuts done. >> and if you can get china and europe doing better. it is hard to be terribly bearish on the u.s. >> y are going to stay with our politico expert. this is a rally that has surprised experts. it hasn't been that easy to be optimistic. >> it is. i think you have to be cautious here. the probability that this could fall apart is very, very real. >> so, you have to be careful up at these levels as a trader. i have low exposure up here. i have protection. that is how you have to play this market. stay with us please. >> yesterday it looked like washington was inching towards a deal. but today, plan b could be signaling differences. we have karen b and sara fagan herself a former political director. i know what it m
it to take three years. another round of bailout loans for greece. greece will be given $64 billion between now and march. they need the money to avoid bankruptcy. in return for the money they had to commit to further measure including more spending cuts and tax increases. >> facebook said it wants to hire the brightest and most talented. this one survey ranking them as the best company in the world to work for. it pays interns $5,600 a month. facebook reportedly offers big payday to try to encourage them to drop out of college. >>> you can get google maps on your i-phone again. the mapping service is again available as an i-phone app. it was in the phones built in system until earlier this year when apple decided to install it's own map system but the quality of those maps was criticized. some users refused to upgrade to a new phone because they didn't want to loose their google maps. >> once again breaking news in the south bay. a high school in coopertino shut down and classes canceled after a threat to the school was found. we are live near monta vista with details on the threat. >>
say we don't want to become like greece. what's driving off the fiscal cliff look like? it makes us look completely irresponsible as if we can't control our own spending and put in order some priorities. >> so some health care will be suffering? >> that's absolutely true. we want to incentive doctors ask hospitals to keep people well. not to just do procedures. and that's the key to really transforming medicare. >> i want to show you a map of the states that are refusing to implement the insurance exchanges. it's rather interesting. the other states are either implementing the exchanges or haven't decided to do that. if states don't decide to do it and the federal government comes in and sets up the exchange, isn't that kind of a win for the move towards universal health care because the infrastructure will be there? >> i think it provides people an option whether governors are refusing or not. that's the most important thing so they can get access to insurance products. also i think, you know, it takes away the claim that the federal government is u surping health care. states forf
to europe for inspiration and guidance for fiscal policy, taking greece, perhaps, as a standard for dealing with economic and budget crises. the speaker did a charge the president is slow walking the nation to the brink of a fiscal cliff. that is one of the speakers firmest in the strongest statements yet. >> this is in a progress report because there is no progress to report. the white house has wasted another week. there are a lot of things that are possible to put the revenue on the table, but none of it is going to be possible. the president insists on his position. insists on my way or the highway. lou: inconveniently the congressional budget office today reported that the federal deficit is already bulging. the cbo reports for the first two months of fiscal 2013 that number $2,902,000,000,000, $57 billion more than the same two month time span last year. and the labor department today reported the unemployment rate fell to the 77%. good news, the lowest jobless rate in four years. the lower unemployment rate, however, the consequence of the more than 300,000 people who dropped out of
anymore, obama's health care tax. the only thing you left out of that wrap is just like greece. >> the first time an attorney general to be held in contempt. >> and the vote that the house republicans want is a political vote. >> they played a bad hand, right now it's going to be a witch hunt. if you get more then it becomes intervention. >> the water has just now breached over the sand dunes. >> hurricane sandy a superstorm meteorologists are calling a once in a lifetime occurrence. the whole coast is devastated. >> the number of ambulances to move these children is remarkable. >> and lost homes in many forms-- ♪ ♪ >> andrew breitbart died this morning, he was 43. he was a publisher, an activist and a commentator, but that says almost nothing about this force of nature. he was a big kid who treated his opponents like humans. it was never about people, it was always, always about principles. . >> the u.s. has just evacuated all personnel from benghazi to tripoli. >> this was something that was a concerted effort, well organizationed, heavily armed. >> you have the america
and greece are also reported to want out. >> it costs to perform, and it costs to stage it. and what do you get back? bluntly a bunch of hoopla and a few pom-poms. it can be uplifting when the times are good. greece won it in 2005, but is it appropriate for the greeks to pump millions or billions in? i think austerity is one reason. but i think also the tone is another. is it right to be celebrating in spandex when your people are out on the streets? >> reporter: looking at some of the countries' economic scorecards, it's hardly surprising. greece is aware that taking part could be an issue. especially as its economy is expected to drop to minus 4.5% next year. portugal, meanwhile, is expected to shrink 1.8%. and poland and slovakia have decided to spend their money on other projects. that's despite projecting positive growth for 2013. ♪ it reportedly costs around $160,000 to take part. and if you win, some countries spend big to host the lavish event. for some national broadcasters, this is reason enough to pull out. >> the cost of staging has been mounting in recent years. russia put on
been doing is going to lead us to being just like greece. we will not be able to take care of the poor and needy or senior citizens. we've got to stop spending. host: this is from the congressional budget office -- social security, medicare, and medicaid are 41% of the federal budget. defense spending is 20% area do you cut? >> we have to cut across the whole circle. it is not the so-called congress' spending. it is everything in that pie plate. need to fix social security and medicare because they are going broke. democratic colleagues are totally in denial. they think they have a policy regarding social security and medicare. they say denied it is a problem and they deny -- and a delay fixing it and third, they will destroy the programs because they are denying and delighting and they are demonizing those of us who want to try to fix it. we need to fix it so that social security and medicare are available for those people needed. we've got to put in place policies that will do so. the democrats have been totally against are doing so. host: are you worried that the republicans are jus
but will be a downward slide to make us like greece. no lodnger a viable economic power. >> hang on. we'll continue this. we have to take a quick break. the fiscal cliff has the president sounding like new york yankees legend yoeg gi ber ra. >> this is deja shz vu all over again. americans want to know why you can't get stuff down in an organized timetable. >> so if we all saw it coming, why did congress wait so long to do something about it? why do toys for tots and hasbro trust duracell to power their donated toys? duralock power preserve. it locks in power for up to 10 years in storage. guaranteed. duracell with duralock. trusted everywhere. anyone have occasional constipation, diarrhea, gas, bloating? yeah. one phillips' colon health probiotic cap each day helps defend against these digestive issues with three strains of good bacteria. approved! [ female announcer ] live the regular life. phillips'. >>> we are back. let me just go back to one point, and that is there are people sitting around wondering whether their taxes will go up. i want to ask you again about the chances of you think of somethin
, but which is what is going on in greece and spain and portugal. it leads to these unemployment rates of 20% in some of these countries. host: mr. bivens? guest: that is not what caused the debt in those countries. spain had a lower gdp debt ratio than we did. i think it shows they do not have an independent monetary policy. they cannot have an independent central bank that just prints money the way that we do. i think it is the un-wisdom of the currency union. there is no evidence that countries with bigger welfare states are in bigger trouble. with the previous caller, i totally agree. the skills of workers more unemployed is not much of to an employers. if there is was this unmet demand for skilled workers out there and employees had openings but there were not the right people, you would see wages spiking in all sorts of occupations. i do not see wages spiking in any sector of the economy right now. the idea that there is this diagnosis that, it is too bad you people are not employed, you people do not have the right skills, there is no evidence that is going on. host: jim on the republ
to our problems so we don't end up in the situation europe is, or greece with riots, or france with a top 75% tax rate that's driving people offshore. >> the problem may be that paul ryan coming through with solid plans on the deficit issue, and ultimately didn't win the white house. is it possible to have the conversation with america get voted in, and then take action? >> personally, i think the ryan plan was an abomination, because it was so vague, that you can't tell whether it was a real plan or not. >> it was not vague. it was written down in the house budget. >> it is absolutely unspecified across all kinds of loophole closings and other things, which makes it filed under category of fiction for anybody that's ever worked in the united states senate. >> specifically it's written specifically in the path to prosperity. it was passed by the house. you can look at path to prosperity in google. you see many of the details. at least the house passed a budget, which the senate has not done for the past three years. the house has laid out solutions. also, laid out changes to the sequester
. but it's not working in greece. i heard a great saying that says when time gets tough, everyone is a keynesian. turn off the tv. not c-span of course. but turn off the news channels that are just cramming this stuff, and get involved in this before you formulate an opinion. i think we would be voted into office smarter, better people that are not tea party extremists. how about if on the democratic side grover norquist had said never cut any spending? i'm going to sign a bill that says never cut and spending. grover norquist, here's a great example, he does not even believe in economic case multipliers. host: gary says -- guest: what's interesting about the last election cycles is we had under president bush and the end, democrats seized control of congress in big numbers. and we had the big democratic sweep with the white house in 2008. 2010, republicans came sweeping back. we've had a pendulum swing, very contractive time period. that's one of the factors. we have seen both sides really dug in because they don't know where the pendulum will swing in the next direction. -- ekle
fiscal accounts in balance and move them in the right direction so that we don't become greece? it is interesting that we talk about the -- the previous panel talked about state government and one big problem in europe is there is no fiscal coordination among the independent countries analogous somewhat to our states and who has to bail them out when they haven't done what they are supposed to do? i don't know that we are all that much different. so, we have a great panel. people that are far smarter than i am. i'm going to introduce them now and i will introduce them all and i will sit down and i get to ask some questions. i will ask the panel to keep i will ask the panel to keep their answers
the economic instability that we have in europe, as to what is happening in greece and we have our fiscal cliff here in the united states, what role do you see the council on foreign relations play in the overall big picture, especially helping to ease the situation of the economic problems in the united states? guest: the council on foreign relations is an independent, non-partisan organization that has nothing to do with the u.s. government other than the fact that our scholars try to help influence and educate the public. the government on foreign policy. the uprising in the arab world, to the caller's question, is happening in the worst of all possible times. the u.s. and strapped financially. europe is back in a recession and confronted with serious economic problems, but europe and the united states would, in the past, be the place that traditionally had helped to support economic change and prosperity in that part of the world. now what we're seeing are caught are countries like -- are countries like qatar in saudi arabia stepping in. again, the instability in the region is timed in perh
to the status of greece? not at all. the simple truth is we are almost close to a position with the status quo would solve our problems. that is to say the expiration of the tax cuts pretty much take care of our intermediate deficit problem and implementation of the cost saving measures strengthened over time in the aca will deal with their long-term health care problem. so we are not that far away and we have other tremendous strengths in our country that would allow us to make the kind of investment to transform the economy, to do with the reality of stagnant wages and a sense of diminished opportunities. we have strengths. we can do it. we need the public to rain and behavior that's destructive and we need political leaders to act forcefully. given enough to bipartisan commissions and searched enough for bipartisan consensus. for sensible hard all politics along these lines. >> norm, i particularly cutie take the money question. a couple political had a great shared that showed that party polarization in congress was directly correlated with increasing concentrations of wealth from increasi
% the last month. the eu finance ministers' plan to give money to greece, will the rally continue? todd gordon is with us aspen trading you. morning to you, todd. >> hey, simon. >> we have failed twice to get through 1.31 on the euro. where do we go from here? >> the fourth time we tried? the euro support and european finance ministers rather busy, appoint the ecb to head up a eu banking regulation which unfortunately you won't take effect until march 2014. the meantime we need to rely on esm for support. the other side, german finance minister wrote off the lower bank, congress that they approve a greek aid bailout. looks to be euro fairly support. >> interesting you argue that. in is the point here that the fed is accelerating on debasing you the dollars, that is why the euro rises? >> really interesting. that was the trade yesterday. the take away from the fed's statement. we reached a new high in qe 4, 85 billion a month, purchased and treasuries and mds that put the dollar to heel. overnight, reaction to the fed, overnight you can the dollar stayed very offered and i think despite
Search Results 0 to 42 of about 43 (some duplicates have been removed)